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How would I know if I am at risk for acute kidney failure?

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Most of the time, kidney failure happens along with another medical condition or event. If you fall into any of the following categories, you may have a greater chance of acute kidney failure:

You have chronic kidney or liver disease.

  • You’ve been hospitalized for a long time, especially in intensive care.
  • You have diabetes.
  • You’re elderly.
  • Blood vessels in your arms and legs are blocked.
  • You have heart failure or high blood pressure.

From: What is Acute Kidney Failure? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Kidney Fund: “Kidney Failure/ESRD.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Failure.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acute Kidney Failure.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Disease: What to Expect.”

Merck Manuals: “Acute Kidney Injury.”

University of New Mexico health Sciences Center: “Electrolyte Imbalance.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 23, 2018

SOURCES:

American Kidney Fund: “Kidney Failure/ESRD.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Failure.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acute Kidney Failure.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Disease: What to Expect.”

Merck Manuals: “Acute Kidney Injury.”

University of New Mexico health Sciences Center: “Electrolyte Imbalance.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 23, 2018

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How do doctors diagnose kidney failure?

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