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How would my treatment be different if I participated in a clinical trial?

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  • You may receive more examinations and tests than are usually given for your particular condition. These tests can assure extra observation.
  • You may be asked to stop or change the medication(s) you are currently taking. You may also be asked to change your diet or any activities that could affect the outcome of the trial.
  • Some clinical trials are double-blind, placebo-controlled. This means that you may receive the real drug or an inactive substance that looks exactly like the drug (called a placebo). Neither the participant nor the researcher will know which drug they are receiving.
Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 28, 2017
Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 28, 2017

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What is informed consent of a clinical trial?

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