PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Is heavy metal poisoning common?

ANSWER

Experts say that heavy metal poisoning is rare. But lots of websites claim it’s common and blame it, without proof, for all sorts of health problems. Many businesses sell unreliable tests and expensive or even dangerous treatments, such as:

Hair analysis or chelation challenge tests (“provoked urine” tests). They’re inaccurate. They can’t tell you if you’re sick or need treatment.

Over-the-counter chelation treatments. These are not approved by the FDA, may not be safe, and there’s no evidence that they work.

If you think you have heavy metal poisoning, don’t try to diagnose it or treat it on your own. See your doctor instead.

From: What Is Heavy Metal Poisoning? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Oregon Public Health, Division Environmental Public Health: “Heavy metals and your

health: Frequently asked questions about testing, treatment and prevention.”

Consumer Reports: “Be Wary of Bogus Supplements for Lead Poisoning.”

FDA: “Questions and Answers on Unapproved Chelation Products.”

Medscape: “Heavy Metal Toxicity.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Heavy Metal Poisoning.”

UpToDate: “Lead Poisoning (The Basics).”

Poison Control, National Capital Poison Center: “Chelation: Therapy or ‘Therapy’?”

Environmental Protection Agency: “Protect Your Family from Exposures to Lead.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 09, 2018

SOURCES:

Oregon Public Health, Division Environmental Public Health: “Heavy metals and your

health: Frequently asked questions about testing, treatment and prevention.”

Consumer Reports: “Be Wary of Bogus Supplements for Lead Poisoning.”

FDA: “Questions and Answers on Unapproved Chelation Products.”

Medscape: “Heavy Metal Toxicity.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Heavy Metal Poisoning.”

UpToDate: “Lead Poisoning (The Basics).”

Poison Control, National Capital Poison Center: “Chelation: Therapy or ‘Therapy’?”

Environmental Protection Agency: “Protect Your Family from Exposures to Lead.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 09, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How are UTIs treated?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: