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What questions can I ask if my child is diagnosed with hemophilia B?

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You can better care for your child by asking your doctor;

  • Is this a severe case?
  • Have you treated someone with this condition before?
  • What treatment do you recommend?
  • How often will we need to come to the doctor's office?
  • How long is too long to bleed from a small cut?
  • What do we need to look out for? Are some symptoms more serious than others?
  • Are there over-the-counter medicines we should or shouldn't use?
  • How do we keep safe? Do we need to limit activities?
  • Do we need to make teachers and care providers aware?
  • How do we connect with other families who have kids with hemophilia?
  • What are the chances our other children will have hemophilia? What about our grandchildren?

From: Hemophilia B WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

KidsHealth: "Hemophilia."

Medscape: "Hemophilia B."

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: "Hemophilia."

National Hemophilia Foundation: "Hemophilia B (Factor IX)."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on June 18, 2018

SOURCES:

KidsHealth: "Hemophilia."

Medscape: "Hemophilia B."

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: "Hemophilia."

National Hemophilia Foundation: "Hemophilia B (Factor IX)."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on June 18, 2018

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