PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are papillomas?

ANSWER

Papillomas are tumors that grow from epithelial tissue and form outward finger-like fronds. They can be benign or malignant. They can grow in the skin, cervix, breast duct, or mucous membrane covering the inside of the eyelid (conjunctiva), for example. These tumors can result from direct contact with an infection such as human papillomavirus (HPV). Some types of papillomas go away on their own. In some cases, surgery is needed to rule out cancer.

SOURCES: Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Facts about Meningiomas." Cleveland Clinic: "Benign Soft Tissue Tumors." American Cancer Society: "Salivary Gland Cancer." UCSF Medical Center: "Fibroids." American Cancer Society: "What is a soft tissue sarcoma?" Children's Hospital Boston: "Hemangioma." American Academy of Family Physicians: "Lipomas." American Brain Tumor Association: "Meningioma." National Cancer Institute: "What You Need to Know About Moles and Dysplastic Nevi." American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Osteochondroma (Bone Tumor)." Cleveland Clinic: "Benign Bone Tumors." eMedicine: "Papilloma, Conjunctival: Treatment & Medication."











Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on July 30, 2019

SOURCES: Brigham and Women's Hospital: "Facts about Meningiomas." Cleveland Clinic: "Benign Soft Tissue Tumors." American Cancer Society: "Salivary Gland Cancer." UCSF Medical Center: "Fibroids." American Cancer Society: "What is a soft tissue sarcoma?" Children's Hospital Boston: "Hemangioma." American Academy of Family Physicians: "Lipomas." American Brain Tumor Association: "Meningioma." National Cancer Institute: "What You Need to Know About Moles and Dysplastic Nevi." American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Osteochondroma (Bone Tumor)." Cleveland Clinic: "Benign Bone Tumors." eMedicine: "Papilloma, Conjunctival: Treatment & Medication."











Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on July 30, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What do white blood cells (WBC) levels mean from a complete blood count (CBC)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: