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What are risks of general anesthesia?

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Rarely, people can be very confused for a few days after their surgery. This is called delirium. Usually it goes away after about a week.

Some people have memory trouble after they get general anesthesia. This is more common in people with heart disease, lung disease, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease. Your doctor should discuss all of these possible complications with you before your surgery.

From: What Is General Anesthesia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Society of Anesthesiologists: "Effects of Anesthesia."

Mayo Clinic: "General anesthesia: How you prepare," "General Anesthesia: Overview," "General anesthesia: Risks," "General Anesthesia: What you can expect," "General anesthesia: Why it's done."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "What to know about general anesthesia."

National Health Service: "General anesthesia."

National Institute of General Medical Sciences: "Anesthesia Fact Sheet."

Nemours Foundation: "About Anesthesia."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on December 28, 2018

SOURCES:

American Society of Anesthesiologists: "Effects of Anesthesia."

Mayo Clinic: "General anesthesia: How you prepare," "General Anesthesia: Overview," "General anesthesia: Risks," "General Anesthesia: What you can expect," "General anesthesia: Why it's done."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "What to know about general anesthesia."

National Health Service: "General anesthesia."

National Institute of General Medical Sciences: "Anesthesia Fact Sheet."

Nemours Foundation: "About Anesthesia."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on December 28, 2018

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How can I lower the risks from anesthesia?

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