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What are some tips for people with a complicated medication regimen?

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Taking medication is absolutely crucial to staying healthy. Here are some tips to keep yourself on track:

  • When it comes to taking organ transplant drugs, strictly follow your health care provider's advice.
  • Use weekly or daily pillboxes to set up doses beforehand, and keep track.
  • Use alarm clocks, timers, or digital watches to help you remember doses.
  • Ask your family members to help you stay on a medication schedule.
  • Keep drugs away from children and pets.
  • Store medication in a cool, dry place.
  • Keep a list of all your drugs somewhere obvious.
  • If you miss a dose, don't assume you can double up with your next one.
  • Keep track of how much medicine you have left. Always call the pharmacy for refills early.
  • If your doctor agrees, take medication with food to prevent gastrointestinal side effects.
  • Set up doses so that they coincide with other daily activities, such as brushing your teeth, eating lunch, or going to bed.
  • Never stop taking a medication without your health care provider's approval.

SOURCES: Barry Friedman, RN, administrative director of the Solid Organ Transplant Program, Children's Medical Center, Dallas; former president of the North American Transplant Coordinators Organization. Richard Perez, MD, PhD, director of the Transplant Center, professor in the Department of Surgery, University of California Medical Center at Davis. Jeffrey D. Punch, MD, associate professor of Surgery, chief of the Division of Transplantation, director of the Liver Transplant Program, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. National Kidney Foundation web site. United Network for Organ Sharing web site. United Network for Organ Sharing's "Transplant Living" web site. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, "Partnering with Your Transplant Team: The Patient's Guide to Transplantation, 2004."


 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on June 30, 2019

SOURCES: Barry Friedman, RN, administrative director of the Solid Organ Transplant Program, Children's Medical Center, Dallas; former president of the North American Transplant Coordinators Organization. Richard Perez, MD, PhD, director of the Transplant Center, professor in the Department of Surgery, University of California Medical Center at Davis. Jeffrey D. Punch, MD, associate professor of Surgery, chief of the Division of Transplantation, director of the Liver Transplant Program, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. National Kidney Foundation web site. United Network for Organ Sharing web site. United Network for Organ Sharing's "Transplant Living" web site. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, "Partnering with Your Transplant Team: The Patient's Guide to Transplantation, 2004."


 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on June 30, 2019

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