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What are symptoms of smallpox?

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Smallpox gets its name from its most common sign of the disease: small blisters that pop up on the face, arms, and body, and fill up with pus.

Other symptoms include:

  • Flu-like fatigue, headache, body aches, and sometimes vomiting
  • High fever
  • Mouth sores and blisters that spread the virus into the throat
  • A skin rash that gets worse over a few weeks.

From: Smallpox WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: World Health Organization: "Smallpox," "Global Alert and Response: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers on Smallpox," "Advisory Committee on Variola Virus Research, Report of the Eleventh Meeting; November 2009." CDC: "Smallpox Factsheet," "Questions and Answers about Smallpox Disease," and "What You Should Know About a Smallpox Outbreak" 2009. , Aug. 1, 2003. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Smallpox."




The Journal of the American Medical Association,
American Family Physician

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 26, 2018

SOURCES: World Health Organization: "Smallpox," "Global Alert and Response: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers on Smallpox," "Advisory Committee on Variola Virus Research, Report of the Eleventh Meeting; November 2009." CDC: "Smallpox Factsheet," "Questions and Answers about Smallpox Disease," and "What You Should Know About a Smallpox Outbreak" 2009. , Aug. 1, 2003. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Smallpox."




The Journal of the American Medical Association,
American Family Physician

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 26, 2018

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How is smallpox treated?

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