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What are the symptoms of a full-blown Cushing's syndrome?

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Cushing's syndrome is when your body has too much stress hormone cortisol. Common symptoms of full-blown Cushing’s are:

  • Rounded, rosy face
  • Weight gain, especially upper body
  • A fat pad in the upper back or base of the neck (you may hear this called a "buffalo hump")
  • Thin arms and legs
  • Acne
  • Tiredness
  • Weak muscles, especially when using your shoulders and hip muscles
  • High blood pressure
  • High blood sugar levels
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Osteoporosis
  • Kidney stones
  • Sleep problems
  • Extra hair growth on your body and face
  • Irregular periods
  • Low sex drive and problems having an erection
  • Thin skin that bruises easily

From: Cushing's Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Cushing's Syndrome."

Medscape: "Cushing Syndrome."

National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Services: "Cushing's Disease."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Cushing's Syndrome Information Page."

Urology Care Foundation: "Cushing's Syndrome."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Cushing's Syndrome."

Medscape: "Cushing Syndrome."

National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Services: "Cushing's Disease."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Cushing's Syndrome Information Page."

Urology Care Foundation: "Cushing's Syndrome."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 14, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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