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What can you do at home to help get rid of malaise?

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Until your doctor identifies and treats the medical condition that's causing your malaise, you may want to see if it helps to be more active and to avoid taking long naps. If you're able to exercise, working out can improve your appetite and boost your energy level. As for naps, keep in mind that an afternoon snooze can make you feel even more sluggish.

From: Why Do I Feel Malaise? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Malaise."

KidsHealth.org: "A to Z Symptoms: Malaise and Fatigue."

Mount Sinai: "Malaise."

St. Mark James Training: "What is Malaise?"

HealthJade.net: "Malaise."

FDA: "Finding and Learning about Side Effects."

LeeHealth.org: "Malaise."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 06, 2019

SOURCES:

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Malaise."

KidsHealth.org: "A to Z Symptoms: Malaise and Fatigue."

Mount Sinai: "Malaise."

St. Mark James Training: "What is Malaise?"

HealthJade.net: "Malaise."

FDA: "Finding and Learning about Side Effects."

LeeHealth.org: "Malaise."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 06, 2019

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