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What causes sepsis?

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Bacterial infections are most often to blame, but sepsis can also result from other infections. It can begin anywhere bacteria or viruses enter the body. So, it could sometimes be caused by something as minor as a scraped knee or nicked cuticle. If you have a more serious medical problem such as appendicitis, pneumonia, meningitis, or a urinary tract infection, you’re also at risk.

If you have an infection of the bone, called osteomyelitis, it could lead to sepsis. In people who are hospitalized, the bacteria that trigger sepsis can enter the body through IV lines, surgical incisions, urinary catheters, and bed sores.

From: What is Sepsis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Scripps Research Institute: "Sepsis." Cleveland Clinic: "Sepsis Overview." National Institute of General Medical Sciences: "Sepsis Fact Sheet." MedlinePlus.gov: "Septic Shock," "Septicemia." University of Maryland Medical Center: "Sepsis-Overview." NYU Langone Medical Center: "Blood Poisoning." Institute for Transfusion Medicine: "DIC, Inflammation, Sepsis and Activated Protein C (APC)."













National Institute of General Medical Sciences: "Sepsis Fact Sheet."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 7, 2019

SOURCES: Scripps Research Institute: "Sepsis." Cleveland Clinic: "Sepsis Overview." National Institute of General Medical Sciences: "Sepsis Fact Sheet." MedlinePlus.gov: "Septic Shock," "Septicemia." University of Maryland Medical Center: "Sepsis-Overview." NYU Langone Medical Center: "Blood Poisoning." Institute for Transfusion Medicine: "DIC, Inflammation, Sepsis and Activated Protein C (APC)."













National Institute of General Medical Sciences: "Sepsis Fact Sheet."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on May 7, 2019

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