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What choices do you have to make about Medicare?

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Traditional Medicare isn’t your only option. You can choose it (Medicare Parts A and B) for hospital care and access to any doctor or hospital in the country that accepts Medicare. Or you can choose a Medicare Advantage plan (also called Medicare Part C), which you buy from a private insurer that provides Medicare benefits.

If you choose Medicare Parts A and B (sometimes called Original Medicrae), you’ll also need to choose a Part D plan if you want prescription drug coverage. You may also want to consider buying a supplemental policy known as a Medigap plan. It can help with your out-of-pocket costs, such as deductibles. Some Medigap plans also have an out-of-pocket maximum, too, meaning there's an annual limit to what you'd have to pay.

If you instead choose a Medicare Advantage plan, it most cases it will include prescription drug coverage so you don’t have to sign up for a separate Part D plan. It may also offer additional coverage like dental or eye glasses. But you’ll be limited to that insurer’s network of providers, and it may cost more. If you chose a Medicare Advantage plan, you can’t buy a supplemental Medigap plan.

From: 9 Things You Didn’t Know About Medicare WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on September 16, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 9/16/2019

SOURCES:

Social Security Administration: “History of SSA During the Johnson Administration 1963-1968.”

Medicare.gov.

Tricia Neuman, senior vice president, Kaiser Family Foundation; director, Program on Medicare Policy and Project on Medicare’s Future, Kaiser Family Foundation.

Deborah Chollet, senior fellow, Mathematica Policy Research.

Steve Zuckerman, PhD, co-director and senior fellow, The Urban Institute.

Stacy Sanders, federal policy director, Medicare Rights Center.

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on September 16, 2019

SOURCES:

Social Security Administration: “History of SSA During the Johnson Administration 1963-1968.”

Medicare.gov.

Tricia Neuman, senior vice president, Kaiser Family Foundation; director, Program on Medicare Policy and Project on Medicare’s Future, Kaiser Family Foundation.

Deborah Chollet, senior fellow, Mathematica Policy Research.

Steve Zuckerman, PhD, co-director and senior fellow, The Urban Institute.

Stacy Sanders, federal policy director, Medicare Rights Center.

Reviewed by Sarah Goodell on September 16, 2019

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