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What does a dipstick urinalysis check for?

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The dipstick test uses a thin plastic strip treated with chemicals. It’s dipped into your urine, and the chemicals on the stick react and change color if levels are above normal. Things the dipstick test can check for include:

  • Acidity, or pH. If the acid is above normal, you could have kidney stones, a urinary tract infection or another condition.
  • Protein. This can be a sign your kidneys are not working right. Kidneys filter waste products out of your blood, and your body needs protein.
  • Glucose. A high sugar content is a marker for diabetes.
  • White blood cells. These are a sign of infection.
  • Bilirubin. If this waste product, which is normally eliminated by your liver, show up, it may mean your liver isn’t working properly.
  • Blood in your urine. Sometimes this is a sign of infections or certain illnesses.

From: What Is Urinalysis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: Urinalysis.

Mayo Clinic: Urinalysis.

National Kidney Foundation: What is a Urinalysis?

Urology Care Foundation: What is a Urinalysis?

University of Utah Eccles Health Sciences Library: Urinalysis.

Kids Health from Nemours Foundation: Urine Tests.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 22, 2017

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: Urinalysis.

Mayo Clinic: Urinalysis.

National Kidney Foundation: What is a Urinalysis?

Urology Care Foundation: What is a Urinalysis?

University of Utah Eccles Health Sciences Library: Urinalysis.

Kids Health from Nemours Foundation: Urine Tests.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 22, 2017

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How can you prepare for a urinalysis?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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