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What happens during the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test?

ANSWER

A lab tech will take a sample of your blood from a vein in your arm or the back of your hand. You may feel a slight sting when the needle pricks through your skin.

It may feel a little bit sore afterward, but you can go straight back to your everyday activities.

Your doctor’s office will send the blood sample to a lab to be analyzed. You should get the results in a few days, depending on how fast the lab and your doctor’s office can work.

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Blood Urea Nitrogen."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Blood Urea Nitrogen."

National Kidney Foundation: "Tests to Measure Kidney Function."

Mayo Clinic: "Blood Urea Nitrogen Test," "Heart Failure."

Scripps Health Foundation: "BUN -- Blood Test."

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Gastrointestinal Bleeding."

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Creatinine."

National Health Service (U.K.): "Malnutrition."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 09, 2019

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Blood Urea Nitrogen."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Blood Urea Nitrogen."

National Kidney Foundation: "Tests to Measure Kidney Function."

Mayo Clinic: "Blood Urea Nitrogen Test," "Heart Failure."

Scripps Health Foundation: "BUN -- Blood Test."

U.S. National Library of Medicine: "Gastrointestinal Bleeding."

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Creatinine."

National Health Service (U.K.): "Malnutrition."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 09, 2019

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What do results from a blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test mean?

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