PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is bicarbonate?

ANSWER

Bicarbonate is a form of carbon dioxide (CO2), a gas waste left when your body burns food for energy. Bicarbonate belongs to a group of electrolytes, which help keep your body hydrated and make sure your blood has the right amount of acidity. Too much or too little bicarbonate can be a sign of a number of conditions, including diarrhea, liver failure, kidney disease, and anorexia.

A bicarbonate test measures how much carbon dioxide is in your blood.

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Bicarbonate.”

Scripps Health: “CO2 Blood Test.”

Lab Tests Online: “Bicarbonate.”

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “Types of blood tests.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “CO2”

The Mayo Clinic: “Diabetic ketoacidosis,” “Emphysema.”

The University of Tennessee Medical Center: “Ethylene glycol poisoning.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on January 28, 2018

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Bicarbonate.”

Scripps Health: “CO2 Blood Test.”

Lab Tests Online: “Bicarbonate.”

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “Types of blood tests.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “CO2”

The Mayo Clinic: “Diabetic ketoacidosis,” “Emphysema.”

The University of Tennessee Medical Center: “Ethylene glycol poisoning.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on January 28, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Why are bicarbonate blood tests done?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: