PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What should you do to avoid infection while in the phase of immunosuppression after an organ transplant?

ANSWER

Right after an organ transplant, you should:   • Wash your hands often. • Avoid sick people. • Avoid people who have been recently vaccinated. Some vaccines may have a living virus in them, which could be a risk to people with weak immune systems.   • Stay out of crowded areas, like malls and movie theaters.   • Let others care for your pets. Your little critters carry germs, so limit your exposure to them.  • Don't garden. Some dangerous bacteria live in the soil.  • Brush and floss daily.  • Don't ignore cuts or scratches. Clean them and put on a bandage.   • Practice safe sex.  










SOURCES: Barry Friedman, RN, administrative director of the Solid Organ Transplant Program, Children's Medical Center, Dallas; former president of the North American Transplant Coordinators Organization. Richard Perez, MD, PhD, director of the Transplant Center, professor in the Department of Surgery, University of California Medical Center at Davis. Jeffrey D. Punch, MD, associate professor of Surgery, chief of the Division of Transplantation, director of the Liver Transplant Program, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. National Kidney Foundation web site. United Network for Organ Sharing web site. United Network for Organ Sharing's "Transplant Living" web site. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, "Partnering with Your Transplant Team: The Patient's Guide to Transplantation, 2004."


 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on June 30, 2019

SOURCES: Barry Friedman, RN, administrative director of the Solid Organ Transplant Program, Children's Medical Center, Dallas; former president of the North American Transplant Coordinators Organization. Richard Perez, MD, PhD, director of the Transplant Center, professor in the Department of Surgery, University of California Medical Center at Davis. Jeffrey D. Punch, MD, associate professor of Surgery, chief of the Division of Transplantation, director of the Liver Transplant Program, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor. National Kidney Foundation web site. United Network for Organ Sharing web site. United Network for Organ Sharing's "Transplant Living" web site. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, "Partnering with Your Transplant Team: The Patient's Guide to Transplantation, 2004."


 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on June 30, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How do doctors diagnose and treat UTIs?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: