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Will I get antibiotics before surgery to lower the risk of MRSA or other infections in the hospital?

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Before surgery, ask if you will need antibiotics. Usually, antibiotics are given shortly before surgery (and stopped within 24 hours) to reduce the risk of wound infections. But don't just assume you're getting antibiotics: ask if you are. If you aren't, ask why.

SOURCES: Peter B. Angood, MD, vice president, chief patient safety officer, The Joint Commission, Oakbridge Terrace, Ill.; co-director, International Center for Patient Safety. Carolyn Clancy, MD, director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Md. Fran Griffin, RRT, MPA, former director, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Cambridge, Mass. Medicare Quality Improvement Community web site: "Surgical Care Improvement Project: Tips for Safer Surgery." Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP): SCIP Project information, MedQIC. Mangram AJ, , 1999. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on February 28, 2018

SOURCES: Peter B. Angood, MD, vice president, chief patient safety officer, The Joint Commission, Oakbridge Terrace, Ill.; co-director, International Center for Patient Safety. Carolyn Clancy, MD, director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Md. Fran Griffin, RRT, MPA, former director, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Cambridge, Mass. Medicare Quality Improvement Community web site: "Surgical Care Improvement Project: Tips for Safer Surgery." Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP): SCIP Project information, MedQIC. Mangram AJ, , 1999. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on February 28, 2018

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