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  • Question 1/8

    A foot has how many bones?

  • Answer 1/8

    A foot has how many bones?

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    About a quarter of the bones in your entire body are in your feet. They get you where you need to go every day. By the time you’re 50, your two feet are likely to have logged about 75,000 miles. That’s about equal to walking around Earth three times.

  • Question 1/8

    You’re most likely to break bones located here:

  • Answer 1/8

    You’re most likely to break bones located here:

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    Bearing the brunt of your body’s weight takes a toll. It’s common to get stress fractures -- tiny breaks -- in the long, thin bones in the middle of your feet, called the metatarsals.

     

    These breaks are usually caused by repetitive motion -- doing the same thing over and over again, like running or walking. But those bones can also break if you drop something on them or have some other kind of accident.

  • Question 1/8

    Women most often wear shoes that are:

  • Answer 1/8

    Women most often wear shoes that are:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When’s the last time you had your foot measured? Feet get longer and wider as you age. And if you’re a woman, giving birth can do that, too. Still, many women keep wearing the same size shoe, and that leads to pain and foot problems.

     

    Before you buy another pair, get your foot measured for both length and width. The best time to do this is the end of the day, when your feet are their largest.

  • Question 1/8

    Babies need to wear shoes.

  • Answer 1/8

    Babies need to wear shoes.

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    • Correct Answer:

    If you’ve ever tried to keep shoes on a baby, you may be glad to know they don’t really need them. Let your little one yank them off. Same goes for super-snug socks, too. His feet are growing so quickly that he doesn’t need anything closing them in. Save the shoes for when he’s walking on his own.

  • Question 1/8

    If you were born with an extra toe, you may pass that trait down to your kids.

  • Answer 1/8

    If you were born with an extra toe, you may pass that trait down to your kids.

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    • Correct Answer:

    About 1 in every 1,000 babies is born with an extra toe or finger. The condition is called polydactyly, which means “extra digit.” It can be passed down in families, but sometimes it’s the result of a medical syndrome. Other times, there’s no known cause. Usually, surgeons remove the extra toe when a child is very young.

  • Answer 1/8

    How long have humans been wearing shoes?

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    Our ancestors knew going barefoot was rough on their feet. They may have worn foot coverings earlier, but they started wearing shoes for support toward the end of the Old Stone Age. Researchers base this on fossil evidence: Shoes changed the way people walked; toes were used less and, as a result, became smaller.

  • Question 1/8

    Stinky feet are caused by:

  • Answer 1/8

    Stinky feet are caused by:

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    Your feet have more than 250,000 sweat glands. Sweat is odorless. But when it mixes with the bacteria on your skin, it can cause a smell. To keep that from happening, try to keep your feet clean and dry. If your foot odor is strong, see a foot doctor called a podiatrist. Prescription medication may help.

  • Question 1/8

    The person with the largest feet in the world wears a size:

  • Answer 1/8

    The person with the largest feet in the world wears a size:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A young Venezuelan man holds the Guinness World Record for biggest feet. They’re each over 15 inches long. He has his shoes custom made. The reason for his large shoe size? He has an overactive pituitary gland, which controls growth.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on June 14, 2018 Medically Reviewed on June 14, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
June 14, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Tight Shoes and Foot Problems,” “Toe and Foot Fractures,” “Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle.”

American Podiatric Medical Association: “Foot Health,” "Sweaty Feet.”

BBC Science: Human Body & Mind: “Skeleton – Hands and Feet.”

Cincinnati Children’s: “Extra Finger or Toe (Polydactyly)”

College of Podiatry: “Get feet stars and facts.”

Foot Health Facts: “Toe and Metatarsal Fractures (Broken toes),” “Foot Health Facts for Women.”

Guinness Workd Record: “Venezuelan man steps up to claim largest feet record title in GWR 2014.”

Healthy Children.org: “Shoes for Active Toddlers.”

Kids Health: “Is My Baby Ready for Shoes?”

Livescience.com: “First Shoes Worn 40,000 Years Ago.”

Mayoclinic.org: “Sweating and Body Odor.”

Medline Plus (U.S. National Library of Medicine): “Foot Injuries and Disorders.”

National Geographic: “Humans Wore Shoes 40,000 Years Ago, Fossils Indicate.”

Seattle Children’s: “What is Polydactyly?”

Trinkaus , E. Journal of Archaelogical Science, 2005.

Universe Today: “How Many Miles Around the Earth?”

 

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