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  • Question 1/12

    Your heart needs 1 straight hour of exercise every day.

  • Answer 1/12

    Your heart needs 1 straight hour of exercise every day.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Physical activity is key, but you don't have to carve out a solid hour daily to do it. Get at least 30 minutes of moderate activity (like gardening, walking, yoga, or a leisurely bike ride) at least 5 days a week. Or you can do at least 25 minutes of harder activity (like running, swimming, or basketball) 3 days a week.

    You can break it up into 10 or 15 minutes here and there, if that works better for you.

  • Question 1/12

    Your heart stops beating when a heart attack strikes.

  • Answer 1/12

    Your heart stops beating when a heart attack strikes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    During a heart attack, the heart is almost always still beating but the blood supply to it is blocked. As a result, it doesn’t get enough oxygen, which can injure the heart. When your heart suddenly stops beating, it's called "cardiac arrest."

  • Question 1/12

    Fiber can lower your cholesterol.

  • Answer 1/12

    Fiber can lower your cholesterol.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It lowers your “bad” cholesterol and may help prevent heart disease. Fiber comes from plants: whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans. It’s usually best to get it from foods, which have many other great nutrients, instead of from supplements. 

  • Question 1/12

    Jaw or back pain could be a sign of a heart attack.

  • Answer 1/12

    Jaw or back pain could be a sign of a heart attack.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Although the most common sign of a heart attack is chest pain or discomfort, it's not always one of the symptoms. You might have shortness of breath, nausea, sweating, or feel lightheaded. Sometimes women especially could have pain or discomfort in other parts of the body, like the back or jaw.

  • Question 1/12

    You get high cholesterol just because of what you eat.

  • Answer 1/12

    You get high cholesterol just because of what you eat.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many things affect your cholesterol level. Your genes matter. But you still have a lot of control, especially with your food choices. Limit items with too much cholesterol or saturated fats, and avoid trans fats completely. To do that, cut back on fatty meats, full-fat dairy products, and deep-fried and processed foods.

  • Question 1/12

    Cut out the salt for your heart’s sake.

  • Answer 1/12

    Cut out the salt for your heart’s sake.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Too much salt is linked to high blood pressure, as well as heart disease and stroke. Remember, a lot of sodium comes from processed foods and restaurant fare. Read labels to see how much sodium is in a serving.

  • Question 1/12

    Low-dose aspirin can help you avoid another heart attack.

  • Answer 1/12

    Low-dose aspirin can help you avoid another heart attack.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The American Heart Association recommends a daily low-dose aspirin for people who are at high risk of a heart attack or who have already had a heart attack or stroke. But first, ask your doctor about the pros and cons. Aspirin helps prevent blood clots, which can lead to heart attack, but it can also cause stomach ulcers and bleeding inside your body.

  • Question 1/12

    Eat only fat-free foods to protect your heart.

  • Answer 1/12

    Eat only fat-free foods to protect your heart.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Fat-free was once a big food trend, but now the main thing is to favor fats that are better for your heart (like canola or olive oils) over those that clog your arteries. And foods that are labeled "fat-free" can still have lots of salt or sugar. Too much of those are bad for your heart. Make smart choices, go for a variety of foods, and keep fat in moderation.

  • Question 1/12

    Being obese is the biggest risk factor for heart disease.

  • Answer 1/12

    Being obese is the biggest risk factor for heart disease.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Sitting on your couch may be the worst thing you can do for your heart. According to a CDC report, 40% of Americans are at risk for heart disease because they're inactive. Close behind, 34% are at risk due to obesity. The other most important risk factors are uncontrolled high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking.

  • Question 1/12

    Heart disease kills more women than breast cancer.

  • Answer 1/12

    Heart disease kills more women than breast cancer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States, killing more women than all forms of cancer combined. One in three women die of heart disease, while one in 31 die of breast cancer.

  • Question 1/12

    To lower chances of heart disease, even non-drinkers should drink red wine.

  • Answer 1/12

    To lower chances of heart disease, even non-drinkers should drink red wine.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many recent studies have suggested that red wine may lower the risk of getting heart disease. If you drink, the American Heart Association suggests no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women. If you don't drink, don't start. The benefits don't outweigh the negative health risks of alcohol -- including high blood pressure, stroke, and obesity.

  • Question 1/12

    Eat fish at least twice a week for a healthy heart.

  • Answer 1/12

    Eat fish at least twice a week for a healthy heart.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The American Heart Association recommends eating fish -- especially fatty fish like salmon and mackerel --  at least two times each week. Fish is a great source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, plus it's not high in unhealthy saturated fat. If you don't like fish, talk to your doctor about taking omega 3 supplements.

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    Results:

    RESULTS: Great job! You sure are smart about your heart!

    Results:

    RESULTS: Not bad. You're pretty smart about keeping your heart healthy.

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    RESULTS: Not great, but take heart: You learned a lot and you can try again.

Sources | Reviewed by James Beckerman, FACC, MD on September 09, 2019 Medically Reviewed on September 09, 2019

Reviewed by James Beckerman, FACC, MD on
September 09, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

photovideostock / iStockphoto

SOURCES:

American College of Cardiology: "Heart Disease: Aspirin."

News release, American Heart Association.

American Heart Association: "About Sodium," "Alcohol and Heart Health," "American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults," "Aspirin and Heart Disease," "Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acids," "Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?" "Heart Disease Statistics at a Glance," "Know Your Fats," "Understanding Your Risk for High Cholesterol," "Whole Grains and Fiber,"  "Women and Cardiovascular Diseases, 2014 update."

CDC Million Hearts: "About Heart Disease & Stroke, Risk Factors."

CDC: "Prevalence of Uncontrolled Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease: United States, 1999–2010," "How much physical activity do adults need?"

Cleveland Clinic: "Margarine or Butter: The Heart-Healthiest Spreads," "What is a Heart Attack?"

Columbia University, Go Ask Alice: "Fiber supplements -- Safe to use every day?"

Harvard School of Public Health: "Ending the Low-Fat Myth."

Kratz, M. European Journal of Nutrition, February 2013.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "What Causes High Blood Cholesterol?"

Rice, B. Current Nutrition Report, 2014.

Stmitko, P. Circulation, 2005.

Texas Heart Institute: "Sudden Cardiac Arrest."

UCSF Medical Center: "Increasing Fiber Intake."

University of Mississippi Medical Center: "Women and Heart Disease."

 

 

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.