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  • Answer 1/8

    Your funny bone is a:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The ulnar nerve runs down the inside of your elbow and controls hand movements and feeling in some fingers. You get that funny-bone feeling, like a mild electric shock, when it bumps against the bone that runs from your elbow to your shoulder -- the humerus. (Though it may not seem humorous when it happens.)

  • Question 1/8

    Elbows are built the same in men and women.

  • Answer 1/8

    Elbows are built the same in men and women.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Women have much more fat padding on the inside part of the elbow than men, something that may protect them against certain types of injuries.  

  • Answer 1/8

    What causes tennis elbow?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They’re micro-tears in the tendons, which attach the muscle to the joint. Your tendons still work, but you’ll feel some pain on the outside of your elbow. Treatment usually involves medication, rest, and physical therapy. 

  • Question 1/8

    Which of these groups is at risk for tennis elbow?

  • Answer 1/8

    Which of these groups is at risk for tennis elbow?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Any repetitive use of your forearm muscle can cause it. And yes, tennis players can get it, too. Carpenters, auto workers, cooks, and butchers also get the condition more than other people.

  • Answer 1/8

    What causes nursemaid’s elbow?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It can happen innocently, when you lift or swing a child by the hand. It’s a kind of dislocation of the elbow that kids get more than adults because of their more flexible joints. Your child may feel pain right away in the elbow, wrist, or shoulder, and it might be hard for him to use or bend his arm. A doctor usually can put it back into place by hand.

  • Question 1/8

    You can kiss your elbow.

  • Answer 1/8

    You can kiss your elbow.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s a well-known quirk of human anatomy that you can’t smooch your own elbow. An informal office poll supported this finding, though at least one person stared blankly and asked, “Why would you want to?” 

  • Answer 1/8

    What is golfer’s elbow?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The cause is the same: micro-tears to the tendons that connect muscle to bone. But the pain is on the inside of the joint instead of the outside. See your doctor to get your elbow problems straightened out.

  • Question 1/8

    The distance from your elbow to your wrist is about the same as:

  • Answer 1/8

    The distance from your elbow to your wrist is about the same as:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Research on the subject is a bit sparse, but if you haven’t already, go ahead and put your foot against your arm. Pretty close, huh?

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You elbowed your way to the front of the pack. Well done!

    Results:

    Not bad -- you only got distracted on a few questions. Did you hit your funny bone?

    Results:

    Looks like you might have been resting on your elbows on this one. Better luck next time.

Sources | Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on July 31, 2018 Medically Reviewed on July 31, 2018

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on
July 31, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) technotr / Getty Images

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis).”

Cleveland Clinic: “MYTHBUSTER: Tennis Elbow.”

Clinical Anatomy: “Anatomy of the ulnar nerve at the elbow: Potential relationship of acute ulnar neuropathy to gender differences.”

KidsHealth.org: “What’s a Funny Bone?”

Mayo Clinic: “Golfer’s Elbow.”

Walter R. Frontera: “Clinical Sports Medicine: Medical Management and Rehabilitation.”

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