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Do I need to tell the teacher if my child is diagnosed with ADHD?

ANSWER

As a parent, you'll need to keep open the lines of communication with your child's teacher to ensure a consistent system of incentives and discipline between school and home.

For example, a younger child's teacher may make a checklist and reward the child with a star or smiley face each time he or she completes a certain number of items on the list.

You may have a similar system at home or provide a bigger reward -- such as a special dinner, a family movie night, or an extra hour of TV or computer time -- when your child gets a certain number of stars or smiley faces.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Walt Karniski, MD, developmental pediatrician; executive director, Tampa Day School, Fla.

CDC: "Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Dana Stempil Herzberg, head of school, Lexis Preparatory School, Scottsdale, Ariz. 

Marjorie Montague, PhD, professor of special education, University of Miami.

Carol Stevenson, San Clarita Valley, Calif.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH): "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Walt Karniski, MD, developmental pediatrician; executive director, Tampa Day School, Fla.

CDC: "Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Dana Stempil Herzberg, head of school, Lexis Preparatory School, Scottsdale, Ariz. 

Marjorie Montague, PhD, professor of special education, University of Miami.

Carol Stevenson, San Clarita Valley, Calif.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

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Should my child's teacher help and support me if they are diagnosed with ADHD?

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