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How does exercise work on children's brains with ADHD?

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Researchers think exercise works on children's brains in several ways:

  • Blood flow. Exercise increases blood flow to the brain. Kids with ADHD may have less blood flow to the parts of their brain responsible for thinking, planning, emotions, and behavior.
  • Blood vessels. Exercise improves blood vessels and brain structure. This helps with thinking ability.
  • Brain activity. Exercise increases activity in parts of the brain related to behavior and attention.

From: Exercise for Children With ADHD WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Medina, J.A. , March 2010. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Chang, Y.K. , March 2012. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

Gapin, J. , December 2010. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology

Kang, K.D. , December 2011. International Journal of Sports Medicine

Gapin, J. I. , June 2011. Preventive Medicine

American Heart Association: "Physical Activity and Children."

Taylor, A.F. , March 2009. Journal of Attention Disorders

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on July 28, 2016

SOURCES:

Medina, J.A. , March 2010. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Chang, Y.K. , March 2012. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

Gapin, J. , December 2010. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology

Kang, K.D. , December 2011. International Journal of Sports Medicine

Gapin, J. I. , June 2011. Preventive Medicine

American Heart Association: "Physical Activity and Children."

Taylor, A.F. , March 2009. Journal of Attention Disorders

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on July 28, 2016

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How does exercise help thinking and behavior in kids with ADHD?

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