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How is snoring related to ADHD?

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Large tonsils and adenoids can partially block the airway at night. This can cause snoring and poor sleep. That, in turn, may lead to attention problems the next day. In one study of 5- to 7-year-olds, snoring was more common among children with mild ADHD than in the other children. In another study, kids who snored were almost twice as likely as their peers to have ADHD. However, that doesn't prove that snoring caused ADHD. Children who snore tend to score worse on tests of attention, language abilities, and overall intelligence. Some studies have shown that taking out the tonsils and adenoids may result in better sleep and improved behavior without the need for medications.

From: ADHD and Sleep Disorders WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Sleep Foundation: "Is It ADHD, Sleep Deprivation, or Both?"

PsychCentral.com: "Sleep Aid for Adult ADHD."

Sleep for Kids: "Common Sleep Disorders Linked to ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on October 28, 2016

SOURCES:

National Sleep Foundation: "Is It ADHD, Sleep Deprivation, or Both?"

PsychCentral.com: "Sleep Aid for Adult ADHD."

Sleep for Kids: "Common Sleep Disorders Linked to ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on October 28, 2016

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What is sleep apnea and what causes it?

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