PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What can you do if you suspect your child has ADHD?

ANSWER

If you are considering having your child evaluated for ADHD or are waiting for an appointment to start the diagnostic process, there are several things you can do in the meantime to help him or her now:

  • Establish a schedule. Make sure your child has the same routine every day. The schedule should include homework time and playtime. Post this schedule in a prominent place in your home.
  • Be clear about expectations. Make sure your child knows what you expect, and be consistent with consequences if those expectations are not met. At the same time, be quick to reward your child when he or she meets expectations.
  • Praise and be positive. Rather than nag and criticize your child, make a point of praising positive behaviors.
  • Help your child organize everyday items. Work with your child to have a place for everything. This includes clothing, backpacks, and school supplies.
  • Jog your child's memory. The same system you use to remember tasks or appointments -- a watch alarm, lists, sticky notes, or a calendar -- may work for your child. Help your child find a system that helps him or her remember appointments, chores, school assignments, and so on.
  • Model good behavior. When you're with your child, manage your own emotions.

SOURCES:

Walt Karniski, MD, developmental pediatrician; executive director, Tampa Day School, Fla.

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Marjorie Montague, PhD, professor of special education, University of Miami.

FDA: "FDA permits marketing of first brain wave test to help assess children and teens for ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

SOURCES:

Walt Karniski, MD, developmental pediatrician; executive director, Tampa Day School, Fla.

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Marjorie Montague, PhD, professor of special education, University of Miami.

FDA: "FDA permits marketing of first brain wave test to help assess children and teens for ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Is it acceptable for my child's teacher to suggest my child has ADHD?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.