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What happens during an ADHD evaluation with an occupational therapist?

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The first thing the therapist does is evaluate your child. They usually do this with input from you and your child's teachers. During the evaluation, the therapist will look at how ADHD affects your child's:

The occupational therapist (OT) will also do a test to find out your child's strengths and weaknesses. Then they'll recommend ways to address your child's issues.

During a therapy session, the OT and your child might:

  • Schoolwork
  • Social life
  • Home life
  • Play games, such as catching or hitting a ball to improve coordination.
  • Do activities to work out anger and aggression.
  • Learn new ways to do daily tasks like brushing teeth, getting dressed, or feeding himself.
  • Try techniques to improve focus.
  • Practice handwriting.
  • Go over social skills.
  • Work on time management.
  • Set up ways to stay organized in the classroom and at home.
  • Come up with an analogy that helps your child understand hyperactivity and how to keep it in check. For example, a “hot engine/cold engine” analogy and how to cool a hot engine down.

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: "Occupational Therapy."

American Occupational Therapy Association: "ADHD," "OT in Schools."

News release, ScienceDaily.

American Academy of Pediatrics.

Pediatrics , June 1, 2012.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 10, 2017

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: "Occupational Therapy."

American Occupational Therapy Association: "ADHD," "OT in Schools."

News release, ScienceDaily.

American Academy of Pediatrics.

Pediatrics , June 1, 2012.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 10, 2017

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What is sensory processing disorder in kids with ADHD?

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