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What is commonly prescribed to treat ADHD?

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Stimulant medications are commonly prescribed to treat teens with ADHD. These drugs may make teens more alert and help them do better at school. Examples of stimulant medications include dexmethylphenidate (Focalin, Focalin XR), dextroamphetamine (Adderall, Adderall XR), lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse), methylphenidate (Concerta, Quillivant XR, Ritalin), and mixed salts of a single-entity amphetamine product (Mydayis). Non-stimulant medications such as Intuniv, Kapvay, and Strattera are also used to treat teens with ADHD. Non-stimulant medications for ADHD have different side effects from stimulant drugs. For instance, they don't often lead to anxiety, irritability, and insomnia, as the stimulant drugs might. They also are not habit-forming and have less likelihood of being abused than stimulant drugs, which may make them a more appropriate option for teens with ADHD who also have alcohol or drug abuse problems.

From: ADHD in Teens WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CHADD: "Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder."

National Resource Center on ADHD: "Symptoms and Diagnostic Criteria."

CDC: "ADHD and Risk of Injury."

National Institutes of Health: "Severe Childhood ADHD May Predict Alcohol, Substance Use Problems in Teen Years."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 20, 2019

SOURCES:

CHADD: "Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder."

National Resource Center on ADHD: "Symptoms and Diagnostic Criteria."

CDC: "ADHD and Risk of Injury."

National Institutes of Health: "Severe Childhood ADHD May Predict Alcohol, Substance Use Problems in Teen Years."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 20, 2019

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What can overmedicating in ADHD cause?

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