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What is sensory therapy for kids with ADHD?

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Occupational therapists use a technique called sensory integrative therapy to help kids with ADHD who have sensory processing disorder. In this technique, the therapist helps to reorganize the child's sensory system, using:

Sensory therapy can be part of an overall treatment for ADHD that includes medicine and behavior therapy. The research on sensory processing disorder is still new. There is some evidence that this technique can help improve issues like impulsivity and hyperactivity. But most experts think occupational therapy is best for help in treating weaknesses in coordination and organization, which children with ADHD often have.

  • Deep pressure, such as massage or the use of a weighted vest or blanket
  • Rhythmic, repetitive movements such as on a swing, trampoline, or exercise ball
  • Different textures for the child to touch
  • Listening therapy to help with sensitivity to sounds

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: "Occupational Therapy."

American Occupational Therapy Association: "ADHD," "OT in Schools."

News release, ScienceDaily.

American Academy of Pediatrics.

Pediatrics , June 1, 2012.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 10, 2017

SOURCES:

Nemours Foundation: "Occupational Therapy."

American Occupational Therapy Association: "ADHD," "OT in Schools."

News release, ScienceDaily.

American Academy of Pediatrics.

Pediatrics , June 1, 2012.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 10, 2017

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Is it normal for kids with ADHD to struggle with going back to school after summer vacation?

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