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What is the treatment plan for ADHD in children?

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In most cases, an ADHD treatment plan will involve both ADHD medication and behavioral therapy, such as a program of rewards for appropriate behavior and consequences for inappropriate behavior, or a system to help inattentive children get organized. Sometimes the school can help with accommodations to your child’s learning and testing environment. If you choose treatment with ADHD medication you will need a prescription and follow-up from a medical doctor (such as your pediatrician, a pediatric psychiatrist, or a neurologist). Some children diagnosed with ADHD may also be experiencing depression or anxiety. In such cases, therapy is often recommended as part of the treatment plan.

SOURCES:

Walt Karniski, MD, developmental pediatrician; executive director, Tampa Day School, Fla.

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Marjorie Montague, PhD, professor of special education, University of Miami.

FDA: "FDA permits marketing of first brain wave test to help assess children and teens for ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

SOURCES:

Walt Karniski, MD, developmental pediatrician; executive director, Tampa Day School, Fla.

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."

Marjorie Montague, PhD, professor of special education, University of Miami.

FDA: "FDA permits marketing of first brain wave test to help assess children and teens for ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

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What can you do if you suspect your child has ADHD?

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