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What non-stimulant drugs may be used to treat ADHD?

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Doctors may also consider prescribing a non-stimulant drug such as atomoxetine (Strattera). It mainly affects a chemical called norepinephrine that's involved in attention, mood, and impulse control.

Other ADHD drugs include:

  • Armodafinil (Nuvigil). A drug that promotes wakefulness and can improve attention, but carries a potential risk for serious skin rashes in children.
  • Bupropion (Wellbutrin). An anti-depressant that may help attention.
  • Clonidine (Kapvay). A high blood pressure medicine that can improve attention.
  • Guanfacine (Intuniv). A high blood pressure medicine that can improve attention.
  • Venlafaxine (Effexor). An anti-depressant that has been shown to improve attention in small studies.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "What medications are used to treat ADHD?"

Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. , Oct. 16, 2011. Pediatrics

Brinkman, W. , April 2011. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association: “ADHD Parents Medication Guide.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 27, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "What medications are used to treat ADHD?"

Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. , Oct. 16, 2011. Pediatrics

Brinkman, W. , April 2011. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association: “ADHD Parents Medication Guide.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 27, 2019

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Do ADHD drugs have side effects?

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