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Who and what is involved in a diagnosis of ADHD?

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You, your child, your child's school, and other caregivers should be involved in assessing your child's behavior. A doctor will also ask what symptoms your child has, how long ago those symptoms started, and how the behavior affects your child and the rest of your family. Doctors diagnose ADHD in children after a child has shown six or more specific symptoms of inattention or hyperactivity on a regular basis for more than 6 months in at least two settings. The doctor will consider how a child's behavior compares with that of other children the same age, and will give your child a physical exam, take a medical history, and may even perform a non-invasive brain scan.

From: ADHD in Children WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children."

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Treatment Options for ADHD in Children and Teens: A review of Research for Parents and Caregivers."

FDA: "How Do You Know if Your Child Has ADHD?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)." 

National Resource Center on ADHD: "Parenting a Child with ADHD (WWK2)."

FDA: "FDA permits marketing of first brain wave test to help assess children and teens for ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 6, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children."

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Treatment Options for ADHD in Children and Teens: A review of Research for Parents and Caregivers."

FDA: "How Do You Know if Your Child Has ADHD?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)." 

National Resource Center on ADHD: "Parenting a Child with ADHD (WWK2)."

FDA: "FDA permits marketing of first brain wave test to help assess children and teens for ADHD."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 6, 2018

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At what age can my child be diagnosed with ADHD?

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