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How can you treat the irritability or moodiness associated with taking ADHD medicine?

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The effects of ADHD medications last only for as long as the drug is in your child’s system. Depending on the formula, that can be anywhere from 4 to 12 hours. When the drug wears off, your child can have a marked “rebound” period, when she’s cranky, often around dinnertime or bedtime.

It can make a big difference if you plan activities around these times. For example, wait until after dinner to start homework, or have a soothing bath and read at bedtime. Your doctor may also recommend a small dose of a shorter-acting medication later in the day. This is sometimes called a booster dose or a homework pill.

SOURCES:

CDC: “Medication and Behavior Treatment Among Children Ages 4-17 Years.”

Child Mind Institute: “Side Effects of ADHD Medication.”

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association: “ADHD Parents Medication Guide.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “ADHD Medication Daily Routines.”

Harstad, E. October 2014. Pediatrics,

National Resource Center on ADHD: “Managing Medication.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 23, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC: “Medication and Behavior Treatment Among Children Ages 4-17 Years.”

Child Mind Institute: “Side Effects of ADHD Medication.”

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association: “ADHD Parents Medication Guide.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “ADHD Medication Daily Routines.”

Harstad, E. October 2014. Pediatrics,

National Resource Center on ADHD: “Managing Medication.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 23, 2018

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