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How does exercise affect the brain of a person with ADHD?

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Exercise isn't just good for shedding fat and toning muscles. It can help keep the brain in better shape, too.

When you exercise, your brain releases chemicals called neurotransmitters, including dopamine, which help with attention and clear thinking. People with ADHD often have less dopamine than usual in their brains.

From: Adult ADHD and Exercise WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "Can adults have ADHD?"

North Carolina State University: "Exercise and ADHD."

CDC: "Physical Activity for Everyone: The Benefits of Physical Activity."

Archer, T. , February 2012. Neurotoxicity Research

Barkley, R.A. , Guilford Press, 2010. Taking Charge of Adult ADHD

Kim, H. , October 2011. Neuroscience Letters

Pagoto, S. , September 2010. Eating and Weight Disorders

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: "ADHD FAQs."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "Can adults have ADHD?"

North Carolina State University: "Exercise and ADHD."

CDC: "Physical Activity for Everyone: The Benefits of Physical Activity."

Archer, T. , February 2012. Neurotoxicity Research

Barkley, R.A. , Guilford Press, 2010. Taking Charge of Adult ADHD

Kim, H. , October 2011. Neuroscience Letters

Pagoto, S. , September 2010. Eating and Weight Disorders

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: "ADHD FAQs."

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on January 17, 2017

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Does exercise have similar effects to ADHD medication?

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