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What are the effects of smoking when you have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)?

ANSWER

Besides the major health risks, smoking may also:

  • Make you more hyper
  • Boost your anxiety
  • Make it harder to focus when you try to quit
  • Lower brain function after just 12 hours without a cigarette
  • Raise your odds of relapse if you do quit
  • Thin your brain’s frontal cortex, which helps you with learning, memory, attention, and motivation

SOURCES:

Columbia University Medical Center: “Four Things People with ADHD Should Know About Smoking.” 

Alcohol Research & Health : “The Clinically Meaningful Link Between Alcohol Use and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.” 

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences : "ADHD and Smoking.”

Smokefree.gov: “Health Effects.” 

Brain and Behavior : "How cigarette smoking may increase the risk of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders.” 

European Neuropsychopharmacology : "Effect of tobacco smoking on frontal cortical thickness development: A longitudinal study in a mixed cohort of ADHD-affected and -unaffected youth.” 

American Journal of Psychiatry : “Frontal Cortex Function,” “ADHD Medication and Substance-Related Problems.”

Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics : “Substance Use Among Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Reasons for Use, Knowledge of Risks, and Provider Messaging/Education,” “Stimulant Treatment of ADHD and Cigarette Smoking.” 

Substance Use and Misuse : “Substance Use in Undergraduate Students With Histories of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.”

PLoS One : “The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: A systematic review with network meta-analyses of randomised trials.” 

CNS Spectrums : “ADHD symptoms in non-treatment seeking young adults: relationship with other forms of impulsivity.” 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on September 06, 2017

SOURCES:

Columbia University Medical Center: “Four Things People with ADHD Should Know About Smoking.” 

Alcohol Research & Health : “The Clinically Meaningful Link Between Alcohol Use and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.” 

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences : "ADHD and Smoking.”

Smokefree.gov: “Health Effects.” 

Brain and Behavior : "How cigarette smoking may increase the risk of anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders.” 

European Neuropsychopharmacology : "Effect of tobacco smoking on frontal cortical thickness development: A longitudinal study in a mixed cohort of ADHD-affected and -unaffected youth.” 

American Journal of Psychiatry : “Frontal Cortex Function,” “ADHD Medication and Substance-Related Problems.”

Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics : “Substance Use Among Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Reasons for Use, Knowledge of Risks, and Provider Messaging/Education,” “Stimulant Treatment of ADHD and Cigarette Smoking.” 

Substance Use and Misuse : “Substance Use in Undergraduate Students With Histories of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.”

PLoS One : “The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: A systematic review with network meta-analyses of randomised trials.” 

CNS Spectrums : “ADHD symptoms in non-treatment seeking young adults: relationship with other forms of impulsivity.” 

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on September 06, 2017

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