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What should I keep in mind if I am taking anti-depressant drugs to treat ADHD or giving them to my child?

ANSWER

Keep these tips in mind if you take antidepressants or give them to your child:  

  • Always give the medication exactly as prescribed. 
  • Give it at least 2 to 4 weeks to start working.  
  • It's best not to miss doses. You take most once or twice a day. 
  • Call your doctor with any problems or questions.   

SOURCES:

Strattera web site.

Kapvay web site: "Monthly Prescribing Reference."

Food and Drug Administration.

American Academy of Childhood and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Medscape web site: “Once-Daily Guanfacine Approved to Treat ADHD.”

Intuniv web site.

Attention Deficit Disorder Resources web site: “Medication Management for Adults with ADHD.”

WebMD Medical Reference: “Should My Child Take Stimulant Medications for ADHD?"

National Institute of Mental Health web site: “Questions Raised about Stimulants and Sudden Death.”

HelpGuide.org web site: “ADD & ADHD Medications.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Strattera web site.

Kapvay web site: "Monthly Prescribing Reference."

Food and Drug Administration.

American Academy of Childhood and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Medscape web site: “Once-Daily Guanfacine Approved to Treat ADHD.”

Intuniv web site.

Attention Deficit Disorder Resources web site: “Medication Management for Adults with ADHD.”

WebMD Medical Reference: “Should My Child Take Stimulant Medications for ADHD?"

National Institute of Mental Health web site: “Questions Raised about Stimulants and Sudden Death.”

HelpGuide.org web site: “ADD & ADHD Medications.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 11, 2017

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Can diet or nutritional problems cause ADHD?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.