PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What should you eat to help with ADHD?

ANSWER

One study says that whatever is good for the brain is likely to be good for ADHD. You may want to eat:

  • A high-protein diet. Beans, cheese, eggs, meat, and nuts can be good sources of protein. Eat these kinds of foods in the morning and for after-school snacks. It may help improve concentration and possibly make ADHD medications work for longer.
  • Fewer simple carbohydrates. Cut down on how many of these you eat: candy, corn syrup, honey, sugar, products made from white flour, white rice, and potatoes without the skins.
  • More complex carbohydrates. These are the good guys. Load up on vegetables and some fruits, including oranges, tangerines, pears, grapefruit, apples, and kiwi. Eat this type of food in the evening and it may help you sleep.
  • More omega-3 fatty acids. You can find these in tuna, salmon, and other cold-water white fish. Walnuts, Brazil nuts, and olive and canola oil are other foods with these in them. You could also take an omega-3 fatty acid supplement. The FDA approved an omega compound called Vayarin as part of an ADHD management strategy.

From: ADHD Diet and Nutrition WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: WebMD ADHD Guide: "Topic Overview." WebMD ADHD Medications and Treatments Blog, Richard Sogn, MD: "ADHD Natural Supplements and Nutrition" and "Food Coloring and Additives." Feingold Association of the United States: "Many learning and behavior problems begin in your grocery cart!" McCann, D. , Nov. 3, 2007. Schonwald, A. , February 2008. 




LancetAAP Grand Rounds

USDA MyPyramid.gov: "What are discretionary calories?"

Bateman, B. June 2004. Arch Dis Child,

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 10, 2017

SOURCES: WebMD ADHD Guide: "Topic Overview." WebMD ADHD Medications and Treatments Blog, Richard Sogn, MD: "ADHD Natural Supplements and Nutrition" and "Food Coloring and Additives." Feingold Association of the United States: "Many learning and behavior problems begin in your grocery cart!" McCann, D. , Nov. 3, 2007. Schonwald, A. , February 2008. 




LancetAAP Grand Rounds

USDA MyPyramid.gov: "What are discretionary calories?"

Bateman, B. June 2004. Arch Dis Child,

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on June 10, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What nutritional supplements can help people with ADHD?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.