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What side effects are associated with ADHD medication titration?

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Most of the side effects from these medications last for a short time as your child adjusts to the drug.

Common side effects include sleeping problems, loss of appetite, and lack of desire to socialize. These often go away after a few weeks, so your doctor may encourage you to wait it out and see if they get better on their own. If they don't, your doctor can adjust the dosage or change the medication.

Less common, but more serious, side effects can include hallucinations, tics, and depression. If your child experiences anything that alarms you, stop the medication immediately and call your doctor.

SOURCES:

Mark Stein, PhD, director of the ADHD and Related Disorders Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association, “ADHD Parents Medication Guide.”

American Academy of Pediatrics, “Common ADHD Medications & Treatments for Children.”

National Resource Center on ADHD, “Managing Medication.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 23, 2018

SOURCES:

Mark Stein, PhD, director of the ADHD and Related Disorders Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association, “ADHD Parents Medication Guide.”

American Academy of Pediatrics, “Common ADHD Medications & Treatments for Children.”

National Resource Center on ADHD, “Managing Medication.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on August 23, 2018

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When is the best time to start titration for ADHD medication in a child?

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