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How can allergy shots help with treating pollen allergies?

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You call them allergy shots. Your doctor calls it "immunotherapy." By either name, the goal is the same: Retrain your immune system so it doesn't go into allergy mode.

When you get allergy shots, your doctor gives you small, gradually increasing amounts of the pollens that are causing your symptoms. Over time, your body builds up a resistance to them. The shots are a long-term commitment, likely taking 3 to 5 years. After that, your doctor will see if you still need them.

From: Medications to Treat Pollen Allergies WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI): “SLIT Treatment (Allergy Tablets) for Allergic Rhinitis Nothing to Sneeze About.”

FDA. "Itching for Allergy Relief?" News release.

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital: "Allergens: Pollen."

National Jewish Health: "Pollen Allergy."

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: "Pollen."

Sanofi-aventis U.S. News release.

UpToDate: “Patient information: Allergic rhinitis (seasonal allergies).”

Mayo Clinic: “Nonallergic rhinitis.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on April 10, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI): “SLIT Treatment (Allergy Tablets) for Allergic Rhinitis Nothing to Sneeze About.”

FDA. "Itching for Allergy Relief?" News release.

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital: "Allergens: Pollen."

National Jewish Health: "Pollen Allergy."

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: "Pollen."

Sanofi-aventis U.S. News release.

UpToDate: “Patient information: Allergic rhinitis (seasonal allergies).”

Mayo Clinic: “Nonallergic rhinitis.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on April 10, 2019

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How do immunotherapy tablets help with treating pollen allergies?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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