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What are symptoms of being allergic to nickel?

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You’ll usually see symptoms 12 to 48 hours after you come into contact with nickel.

You may notice itching, redness, rash, dry patches, and swelling of the skin. Sometimes blisters follow. They may break, leaving crusts and scales.

If left untreated, your skin may become darker, leathery, and cracked. Most likely, the rash is only on the part of your skin in direct contact with the nickel.

In serious cases, the rash may spread. Sweating can make it worse.

If your skin becomes infected, it will become warm and redder or filled with pus. Get medical care right away.

From: Are You Allergic to Nickel? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Osteopathic College of Dermatology: "Nickel Allergy."

Baylor College of Medicine: "Nickel Allergies Are Itching to Come out of Hiding."

University of Alabama at Birmingham Medicine: "Allergic Contact Dermatitis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Allergic Contact Rashes."

Mayo Clinic: ''Nickel allergy.''

Indian Journal of Dermatology: "Low Nickel Diet In Dermatology." 2013, May-June.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 22, 2017

SOURCES:

American Osteopathic College of Dermatology: "Nickel Allergy."

Baylor College of Medicine: "Nickel Allergies Are Itching to Come out of Hiding."

University of Alabama at Birmingham Medicine: "Allergic Contact Dermatitis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Allergic Contact Rashes."

Mayo Clinic: ''Nickel allergy.''

Indian Journal of Dermatology: "Low Nickel Diet In Dermatology." 2013, May-June.

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on October 22, 2017

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How can you test to see if you are allergic to nickel?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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