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What can be used to diagnose sinus problems?

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Sometimes other tests such as computed tomography (CT) scan or cultures are used to help make the diagnosis.

Despite the recommendations that antibiotics be prescribed sparingly, they're still overused for sinusitis, according to many physicians who specialize in treating sinus problems.

Some physicians say they give patients with sinusitis a prescription for antibiotics, tell them to wait 3 to 5 days before filling it, and to only fill it if their symptoms are not better by then. A decongestant can be used to help relieve your symptoms and promote drainage.

The longer symptoms last, the more likely a sinus problem is to be a bacterial infection, some experts say.

SOURCES: Williamson, I.G. , Dec. 5, 2007. Lindbaek, M. , Dec. 5, 2007. MedlinePlus: "Allergy."  MedlinePlus: "Sinusitis." Slavin, R. Dec. 2005. Todd Kingdom, MD, director of rhinology and sinus surgery, National Jewish Health, and associate professor of otolaryngology, University of Colorado, Denver. Jordan S. Josephson, MD, ear-nose-throat specialist, Manhattan, staff physician, Manhattan Eye Ear and Throat Hospital, and author of Sinus Relief Now (Penguin, 2006). Russell B. Leftwich, MD, Nashville, Tenn., allergist and spokesperson, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Richard F. Lavi, MD, allergist, Beachwood, Ohio, and member, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.








Journal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology,

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 12, 2017

SOURCES: Williamson, I.G. , Dec. 5, 2007. Lindbaek, M. , Dec. 5, 2007. MedlinePlus: "Allergy."  MedlinePlus: "Sinusitis." Slavin, R. Dec. 2005. Todd Kingdom, MD, director of rhinology and sinus surgery, National Jewish Health, and associate professor of otolaryngology, University of Colorado, Denver. Jordan S. Josephson, MD, ear-nose-throat specialist, Manhattan, staff physician, Manhattan Eye Ear and Throat Hospital, and author of Sinus Relief Now (Penguin, 2006). Russell B. Leftwich, MD, Nashville, Tenn., allergist and spokesperson, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Richard F. Lavi, MD, allergist, Beachwood, Ohio, and member, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.








Journal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology,

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 12, 2017

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When should antibiotics be used to treat sinus problems?

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