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What causes fall allergies?

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Ragweed is the biggest allergy trigger in the fall. Though it usually starts to release pollen with cool nights and warm days in August, it can last into September and October.

Mold is another fall trigger. You may think of mold growing in your basement or bathroom -- damp areas in the house -- but mold spores also love wet spots outside. Piles of damp leaves are ideal breeding grounds for mold.

Dust mites can get stirred into the air the first time you turn on your heat in the fall. They can trigger sneezes, wheezes, and runny noses.

From: Fall Allergies WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Allergic Rhinitis," "Preparing for School with Asthma and Allergies."

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: "Running from Ragweed: How to Cope with Fall Allergies," "Ragweed Allergy."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease: "Airborne Allergens."

Im, W. , September/October 2005. Archives of Environmental Occupational Health

Silverman, R. , September 2005. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 20, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Allergic Rhinitis," "Preparing for School with Asthma and Allergies."

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: "Running from Ragweed: How to Cope with Fall Allergies," "Ragweed Allergy."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease: "Airborne Allergens."

Im, W. , September/October 2005. Archives of Environmental Occupational Health

Silverman, R. , September 2005. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 20, 2018

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How can going back to school cause allergies in the fall?

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