PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What does an eosinophil count do?

ANSWER

The eosinophil count measures the amount of eosinophils in your blood. They’re a kind of white blood cell that helps fight disease. The exact role of eosinophils in your body isn't clear, but they're usually associated with allergic diseases and certain infections. They're made in your bone marrow and then travel to different tissues.

Your eosinophils do two important things in your immune system: curb infections and boost inflammation, which can help you fight off a disease.

The key is for eosinophils to do their job and then go away. But when you have too many eosinophils in your body for a long time, doctors call this eosinophilia. It can cause chronic inflammation. This can damage tissues. Conditions where there are too many eosinophils are in the body include eosinophilic esophagitis (a disorder in your esophagus) or eosinophilic colitis (in your large intestine). Eosinophilic disorders can happen in your stomach, small intestine, blood, or other organs, too. Sometimes, a biopsy will show that you have a high amount of eosinophils in your tissues, but you might not have a high amount in your blood.

SOURCES:

UCSF Medical Center: "Eosinophil Count Absolute."

UCLA: "Cushing's Disease."

Mayo Clinic: "Eosinophilia."

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital: "What is an Eosinophilic Disorder?"

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 21, 2019

SOURCES:

UCSF Medical Center: "Eosinophil Count Absolute."

UCLA: "Cushing's Disease."

Mayo Clinic: "Eosinophilia."

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital: "What is an Eosinophilic Disorder?"

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 21, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How is an eosinophil count done?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: