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What should you know about using antibiotics for sinus problems?

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Patients with painful sinus problems often plead with their doctors to give them an antibiotic ASAP.

About 90% of adults seen in the U.S. by a general practice physician do end up getting an antibiotic for acute sinusitis, research has found.

Acute sinusitis is a sinus infection that lasts less than four weeks. Chronic sinusitis lasts longer than 12 weeks. Infections of the sinuses, hollow air spaces within the bones in the cheek bones, forehead and between the eyes, are usually caused by viral or bacterial infections. They cause thick mucus blockage and discomfort of theses cavities.

But antibiotics may not always be the best remedy for sinusitis, according to recent research and physician experts. Your body should be able to cure itself of a mild or moderate sinusitis and avoid antibiotics that can cause antibiotic resistance.

Spare use of antibiotics is now recommended by many agencies that have published guidelines, including practice guidelines issued jointly by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

SOURCES: Williamson, I.G. , Dec. 5, 2007. Lindbaek, M. , Dec. 5, 2007. MedlinePlus: "Allergy."  MedlinePlus: "Sinusitis." Slavin, R. Dec. 2005. Todd Kingdom, MD, director of rhinology and sinus surgery, National Jewish Health, and associate professor of otolaryngology, University of Colorado, Denver. Jordan S. Josephson, MD, ear-nose-throat specialist, Manhattan, staff physician, Manhattan Eye Ear and Throat Hospital, and author of Sinus Relief Now (Penguin, 2006). Russell B. Leftwich, MD, Nashville, Tenn., allergist and spokesperson, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Richard F. Lavi, MD, allergist, Beachwood, Ohio, and member, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.








Journal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology,

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 12, 2017

SOURCES: Williamson, I.G. , Dec. 5, 2007. Lindbaek, M. , Dec. 5, 2007. MedlinePlus: "Allergy."  MedlinePlus: "Sinusitis." Slavin, R. Dec. 2005. Todd Kingdom, MD, director of rhinology and sinus surgery, National Jewish Health, and associate professor of otolaryngology, University of Colorado, Denver. Jordan S. Josephson, MD, ear-nose-throat specialist, Manhattan, staff physician, Manhattan Eye Ear and Throat Hospital, and author of Sinus Relief Now (Penguin, 2006). Russell B. Leftwich, MD, Nashville, Tenn., allergist and spokesperson, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Richard F. Lavi, MD, allergist, Beachwood, Ohio, and member, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.








Journal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology,

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 12, 2017

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What can be used to diagnose sinus problems?

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