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What's the treatment for a drug allergy?

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Drug allergy treatments include:

  • Antihistamines and, in some cases, corticosteroids, to control rash, hives, and itching.
  • Bronchodilators such as albuterol or Combivent, to widen your airways and help coughing and lung congestion.
  • Epinephrine, given as a shot in cases of anaphylaxis, which is a medical emergency. You'll definitely need immediate medical care, even if you feel better after getting the drug.
  • A process called desensitization, which treats allergy to penicillin or other drugs. Over time, you’ll get shots of tiny amounts of penicillin, with increasingly larger amounts until your immune system can handle the drug. You'll probably get this procedure only if no other medicines can treat your condition.

From: Drug Allergies WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

FDA: "Avoiding Drug Interactions."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Drug Reactions."

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: "Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions: Tips to Remember."

 

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

SOURCES:

FDA: "Avoiding Drug Interactions."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Drug Reactions."

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: "Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions: Tips to Remember."

 

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

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How can I be prepared for a drug allergy?

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