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  • Question 1/9

    Which is most likely to cause allergies?

  • Answer 1/9

    Which is most likely to cause allergies?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many fruit trees and plants with colorful flowers, such as roses and daffodils, have larger pollen grains that don't blow around. You don't need to worry about them. It's the tiny pollen that you can't see that causes sneezing and itchy, runny noses.

     

    Pollen isn't the only problem, though. Some people are allergic to molds from compost and bark mulch as it breaks down. Buy finished compost if you have a mold allergy.

  • Question 1/9

    If you're allergic to ragweed, you might not want to eat:

  • Answer 1/9

    If you're allergic to ragweed, you might not want to eat:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This pesky weed, which grows across the U.S., bothers 75% of Americans with pollen allergies.

     

    If you have a ragweed allergy, watch what you eat and drink. Bananas, cucumbers, zucchini, melons, and sunflower seeds can cause you to itch and swell around your mouth.Your body confuses the proteins in these foods with the proteins in the plant.

  • Question 1/9

    Can showering at night relieve allergy symptoms?

  • Answer 1/9

    Can showering at night relieve allergy symptoms?

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    • Correct Answer:

    It washes off pollen that might be in your hair and on your skin, and keeps it off your pillow and bed. An evening bath works fine, too.

     

    If you’ve been outside when the pollen count is high, change your clothes near your washing machine if you can. That'll keep you from bringing the pollen throughout your home. Put them in the laundry before bathing.

     

    It's also a good idea to keep windows and doors shut, and use an air conditioner with a HEPA filter.

  • Question 1/9

    Pollen allergies are only a problem in the spring and fall.

  • Answer 1/9

    Pollen allergies are only a problem in the spring and fall.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Trees put out pollen in the late winter and spring, and grass releases the sneezy stuff in the late spring and summer.

    Weeds cause hay fever -- the common name for seasonal allergies -- in the late summer and fall.

    Some people are allergic to pollen in cedar trees, which peak in late winter as well as spring. Warmer winters cause trouble for people with spring allergies. That’s because their symptoms start earlier.

  • Question 1/9

    When are pollen levels highest?

  • Answer 1/9

    When are pollen levels highest?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Pollen levels usually peak between 5 a.m. and 10 . Plan outdoor activities for the afternoon, if you can. 

    Warm, dry, and breezy days help pollen travel. Rain washes it away, and counts are usually lowest during or just after a downpour.

     

  • Question 1/9

    How long before allergy shots help you feel better?

  • Answer 1/9

    How long before allergy shots help you feel better?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Don’t expect to feel better right after your first one. Everybody reacts differently, but it usually takes 4 to 6 months of shots before you feel relief.

    Most people's symptoms get better after the first year of the treatment.

    Allergy shots contain a small amount of the thing you're allergic to, so your body can slowly get used to it and not react to it anymore.

  • Question 1/9

    Certain over-the-counter nasal sprays can make your nose stuffier.

  • Answer 1/9

    Certain over-the-counter nasal sprays can make your nose stuffier.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Using an OTC decongestant nasal spray for more than 3 days at a time could make you more congested. When the effects of it wear off, the tissue inside your nose and sinuses could swell more.You might then use more spray -- making the swelling worse.

    Consider using a steroidnose spray, which reduces swelling, if you're congested often.

  • Question 1/9

    What can you wear to protect your eyes from pollen?

  • Answer 1/9

    What can you wear to protect your eyes from pollen?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If allergies are making your eyes watery, itchy, and red, consider wearing a hat with a wide brim when you're outside. It will help keep pollen from blowing into your eyes.

    Wear sunglasses, too. And use saline drops after being outdoors to wash away any pollen from the lining of your eyes.

  • Question 1/9

    Moving to a different city will solve your allergy problems.

  • Answer 1/9

    Moving to a different city will solve your allergy problems.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Taking a vacation might clear up your symptoms for a while, but moving won’t make your allergies go away. Some plants and grasses grow all over the U.S., making them tough to escape. Andwithin a few years, you’d likely get allergies to plants and grasses near your new home.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on April 18, 2017 Medically Reviewed on April 18, 2017

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
April 18, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Tom Merton / OJO Images

 

SOURCES:

Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics: "News for Your Nose: Nasal Corticosteroids."

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Allergic Rhinitis: Hay Fever," "Hay Fever Medications," "Making the Most of Your Spring Allergy Visit," "Pine Tree Allergy,"  "Ragweed Tumbles In," "Spring Allergies."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Allergic Rhinitis: Allergy Shots: Could They Help Your Allergies?" "Allergic Rhinitis: Prevention," "Allergic Rhinitis: Treatment."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Allergic Rhinitis: Hay Fever," "Hay Fever Treatment," "Ragweed."

Allergy Testing and Treatment Center: "How to Minimize Effects of Cedar Fever."

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: "An Unwelcome Harvest, Fall Allergies Arrive," "Fall Allergy Capitals 2012, The Most Challenging Places to Live With Fall Allergies,"  "Immunotherapy," "Pollen and Mold Counts," "Ragweed Allergy," "Rhinitis and Sinusitis."

Exton Allergy and Asthma Associates: "Outdoor Pollen Allergen Avoidance."

National Jewish Health: "Allergic and Non-Allergic Rhinitis," "Pollen Allergy: Reduce Pollen Exposure."

Northwestern Memorial Hospital: "Mild Winter Leads to Early Allergen Season."

University of Vermont Extension System, Department of Plant and Soil Science: "Allergies and Gardening."

 

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.