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  • Answer 1/10

    Skin allergies happen because:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Got a skin issue? One of many things could be to blame for it, like a virus, bacteria, fungal infection, or an autoimmune disorder like lupus.

    Your red, blotchy, or bumpy skin is an allergic reaction only if it’s caused by an allergen -- something your body thinks is an invader. In that case, your immune system makes antibodies. These prompt your body to make chemicals like histamine that cause the reactions.

  • Question 1/10

    Which of these can cause a skin allergy?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which of these can cause a skin allergy?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Almost anything can set off an allergic skin reaction in people with sensitive immune systems.

    Other possible triggers include:

    • Pet dander
    • Hot temperatures
    • Food
    • Plants
    • Insects
    • Medication
  • Question 1/10

    If you touch poison ivy, you’ll always get a rash:

  • Answer 1/10

    If you touch poison ivy, you’ll always get a rash:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You’re not guaranteed to get an itchy annoyance. It’s usually about a 50-50 shot. It’ll depend on how much ivy you came in contact with and what part of your body touched it. Certain spots, like your face, are extra sensitive.

    You also might fall into the small but lucky group of people -- about 15% of us -- who aren’t allergic to urushiol, the irritating oil that coats poison ivy leaves.

    Not so lucky? You may start seeing red anywhere from 4 hours to 4 days after your run-in.

  • Question 1/10

    Children with eczema are more likely to get:

  • Answer 1/10

    Children with eczema are more likely to get:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You may hear your doctor mention something called “atopic march.”

    It basically means that allergic conditions like the ones listed above can get stronger as you get older. Eczema usually gets better with age.

  • Question 1/10

    Jewelry made with which metal is most likely to cause an allergic reaction?

  • Answer 1/10

    Jewelry made with which metal is most likely to cause an allergic reaction?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Nickel, most commonly found in costume jewelry, is known for causing something called “allergic contact dermatitis.” That’s a reaction that happens when you touch something you’re allergic to.

    Other common triggers for it include:

    • Soap
    • Shampoo
    • Laundry detergent
  • Question 1/10

    If you’re allergic to copper, you may also react to:

  • Answer 1/10

    If you’re allergic to copper, you may also react to:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Gold on its own is pretty soft. Other metals are often added to it to make it stronger. The 14-karat kind is only about 58% gold. The rest is a combination of metals. Those may include allergens like copper and nickel.

  • Question 1/10

    If you’re allergic to shellfish, you’ll get hives the first time you eat shrimp.

  • Answer 1/10

    If you’re allergic to shellfish, you’ll get hives the first time you eat shrimp.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Food allergies sometimes show up in the form of hives, in some cases with more serious things like swelling of the tongue, vomiting, and trouble breathing. But none of this happens the first time you’re exposed to an allergen, including food.

    When you first eat or touch an allergen, your immune system decides it’s dangerous and makes antibodies against it. This gets your body ready to react the next time you touch it.

  • Question 1/10

    Some things can give you a reaction only after you use them and then go out in the sun.

  • Answer 1/10

    Some things can give you a reaction only after you use them and then go out in the sun.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s called “photoallergic contact dermatitis,” and here’s how it works: You’re exposed to an allergen, which might be in your shaving cream, lotion, perfume, or even in a food that touches your skin. 

    That allergen by itself doesn’t bug you enough to cause a reaction, but when the sun hits your skin, the combination causes you to break out in a rash.

  • Question 1/10

    Which test is commonly used to diagnose skin allergies?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which test is commonly used to diagnose skin allergies?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your doctor will put patches on your arm or back that contain 20 to 30 extracts of allergens that cause reactions. You’ll wear the patches for 48 hours before your doctor removes them. If you have irritation in those areas, it usually means you’re allergic to those things.

  • Answer 1/10

    The best way to avoid getting allergy symptoms is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Once you figure out what’s irritating your skin, your best bet is to avoid it. But accidents happen. It’s also not always possible to dodge everything you’re allergic to. When a reaction crops up, a cream or ointment that you put on your skin should help calm things down.

    In some cases -- like when a reaction leads to a widespread rash -- you might need to see your doctor and have him prescribe a medicine called prednisone, which you’d take in pill form.

  • Your Score:

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You’re in the clear! You know a lot about what causes skin allergies and how to make symptoms disappear.

    Results:

    Nice try. You have a solid grasp on skin allergies, but you could use a few more pointers if you want your skin to stay perfectly calm and clear.

    Results:

    No wonder you’re so itchy! Study up and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Debra Jaliman, MD on April 25, 2018 Medically Reviewed on April 25, 2018

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman, MD on
April 25, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY: Getty

SOURCES:
American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “Allergies,” “Atopic March,” “Skin Allergies,” “Skin Allergy.”
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “Types of Allergies: Skin Allergy.”
Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: “Allergy Treatment,” “Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis),” “What is an Allergic Skin Condition?”
Center for Young Women’s Health, Boston Children’s Hospital: “Poison Ivy.”
International Gem Society: “Jewelry Metals 101.”
Mayo Clinic: “Allergy Skin Tests,” “Oral Thrush,” “Roseola.”
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “Food Allergy: An Overview.”
Stanford Health Care: “Skin Allergies and Contact Dermatitis Clinic.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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