Do You Know the Symptoms of a Bee Sting Allergy?

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 22, 2017

Riskiest Symptoms

If you have a severe bee sting allergy that causes an emergency condition called anaphylaxis, the symptoms include:

If that happens, call 911 immediately. If you have an epinephrine auto-injector, use it and repeat after 5 to 15 minutes if your symptoms haven’t improved. You’ll still need medical care right after you give yourself the shots, even if your symptoms seem to stop, because you could still have a delayed reaction.

That’s not likely. Most people aren’t allergic and only have minor symptoms in the area where they got stung, such as:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Itching or burning

Call Your Doctor If:

You think you might have had an allergic reaction to a sting in the past. Your doctor can check on that and see if you’re at risk for anaphylaxis.

WebMD Medical Reference

Sources

SOURCES: 

Johns Hopkins Medicine. 

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. 

American Academy of Allergy. 

The Food and Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. 

WebMD Medical News: "Kids Don't Always Outgrow Sting Allergies." 

National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases. 

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Bee Poison."

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