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How can NMDA receptor antagonist drugs help with Alzheimer's disease?

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If you have Alzheimer's disease, your cells can make too much glutamate. When that happens, the nerve cells get too much calcium, and that can speed up damage to them. NMDA receptor antagonists make it harder for glutamate to "dock" -- but they still let important signals flow between cells. Scientists are studying how they can be used against Alzheimer's.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Current treatments."

Strong, K. , October 2014. Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents

Chen, H. , June 2006. Journal of Neurochemistry

Deardorff, W. . Published online, July 2016. Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy

Esposito, Z. , April 2013. CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics

Zarate, C. , October 2010. Harvard Review of Psychiatry

Olivares, D. , July 2012. Current Alzheimer Research

Kapur, S. , September 2002. Molecular Psychiatry

National Institute on Drug Abuse: "DrugFacts: Hallucinogens."

University of Maryland, Center for Substance Abuse Research: "Ketamine."

Cleveland Clinic: "Hallucinogens -- LSD, Peyote, Psilocybin and PCP."

News release, University of Cincinnati: "Ketamine Shows Promise as Therapy for Brain Trauma and Mood Disorders."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 01, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "Current treatments."

Strong, K. , October 2014. Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents

Chen, H. , June 2006. Journal of Neurochemistry

Deardorff, W. . Published online, July 2016. Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy

Esposito, Z. , April 2013. CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics

Zarate, C. , October 2010. Harvard Review of Psychiatry

Olivares, D. , July 2012. Current Alzheimer Research

Kapur, S. , September 2002. Molecular Psychiatry

National Institute on Drug Abuse: "DrugFacts: Hallucinogens."

University of Maryland, Center for Substance Abuse Research: "Ketamine."

Cleveland Clinic: "Hallucinogens -- LSD, Peyote, Psilocybin and PCP."

News release, University of Cincinnati: "Ketamine Shows Promise as Therapy for Brain Trauma and Mood Disorders."

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 01, 2018

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