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How can you help plan for the future for someone with Alzheimer's disease?

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Here’s a checklist of things you might plan. It’s a big task, so tackle it in steps:

  • Create a team so people can divide the tasks.
  • Keep a record of facts and figures before their memory fades. Gather practical as well as sentimental information.
  • Get their complete medical picture, including blood type, all health conditions, medications they take, past surgeries and the names of all their doctors. Get their permission to access health records.
  • Sign a health care proxy to legally make medical decisions for your loved one.
  • Track their finances. Gather bank, investment, mortgage, and other account numbers, total assets, outgoing expenses and insurance policies.
  • Find the latest version of their will and estate plan. Ask if they have or want a living will, a legal document that spells out their wishes for end-of-life care. It’s important to have clear instructions and decide who will put their affairs in order.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association.

Hurme, S. , ABA, 2015. The ABA/AARP Checklist for Family Caregivers: A Guide to Making it Manageable

AARP.

Aging Care, LLC.

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Advance Directives and Do Not Resuscitate Orders.”

Reviewed by Richard Senelick on June 08, 2017

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association.

Hurme, S. , ABA, 2015. The ABA/AARP Checklist for Family Caregivers: A Guide to Making it Manageable

AARP.

Aging Care, LLC.

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Advance Directives and Do Not Resuscitate Orders.”

Reviewed by Richard Senelick on June 08, 2017

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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