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How can you help someone with Alzheimer's when you're far away?

ANSWER

Even from a distance, you can offer a lot of help, such as:

  • Set up online payments to take care of your loved one's bills.
  • Make sure a living will, health-care proxy, and power of attorney are in place.
  • Keep on top of Medicaid, Medicare, or private insurance claims.
  • Try to visit every few weeks or months, and be on the lookout for any cognitive changes.
  • Ask a neighbor or nearby friend to drop by often and give you updates.
  • You may at some point need to hire a full-time in-home aide or consider moving your loved one into assisted living or a nursing home.
  • Have your loved one give you written permission for their doctors to share medical information with you.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "2013 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures;" "Glossary: Long-distance caregiving;" "Stages of Alzheimer's;" and "Long-Distance Caregiving."

NIH/National Institute on Aging: "Long-Distance Caregiving: 20 Questions and Answers."

Marisa Cohen, caregiver, Toronto.

Family Caregiver Alliance.

 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on April 10, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer's Association: "2013 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures;" "Glossary: Long-distance caregiving;" "Stages of Alzheimer's;" and "Long-Distance Caregiving."

NIH/National Institute on Aging: "Long-Distance Caregiving: 20 Questions and Answers."

Marisa Cohen, caregiver, Toronto.

Family Caregiver Alliance.

 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on April 10, 2018

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What signs can I check to see how much help my loved one with Alzheimer’s needs?

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