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How effective are cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of dementia?

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What to expect: Most people with Alzheimer’s who take one of these medications get some benefit from it, including less anxiety, improved motivation, and better concentration and memory. And some are able to continue with their regular activities.

But the improvements don’t seem to last long -- about 6 to 12 months. They mainly delay the worsening of the disease for a period of time.

All three medicines work similarly, but one might work better for your loved one than it does for someone else.

From: What Medicines Treat Dementia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Alzheimer’s & Dementia,” “Medications for Memory Loss.”

CDC, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry: “What are Cholinesterase Inhibitors?”

Alzheimer’s Society: “Memantine,” “Drug Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Mayo Clinic: “Dementia,” “Vascular Dementia: Treatment and Drugs.”

AlzForum: “Memantine.”

Alzheimer’s Australia: “Drug Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease: Cholinesterase Inhibitors.”

National Institute of Health, Medline Plus: “Understanding Alzheimer's.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on August 4, 2018

SOURCES:

Alzheimer’s Association: “Alzheimer’s & Dementia,” “Medications for Memory Loss.”

CDC, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry: “What are Cholinesterase Inhibitors?”

Alzheimer’s Society: “Memantine,” “Drug Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Mayo Clinic: “Dementia,” “Vascular Dementia: Treatment and Drugs.”

AlzForum: “Memantine.”

Alzheimer’s Australia: “Drug Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease: Cholinesterase Inhibitors.”

National Institute of Health, Medline Plus: “Understanding Alzheimer's.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on August 4, 2018

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What are side effects of cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of dementia?

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